A Field Guide to Unmarked and/or Repainted U.S. Coleman Camp Stoves of the 1920’s through 1940’s

John Stendahl – updated 2 May 2017

Many of the camp stoves of the 30’s and 40’s have either lost their identifying badge or decals or have been repainted over the years, obliterating any original markings. The earliest stove models had a badge with the model stamped on it and are usually easy to identify. They are included here in the off chance that one is found without that badge. Coleman stove models changed frequently during this era and with only subtle differences between them, many are difficult to identify solely by comparing them to photos.

Of the two-burner camp stoves, there were three basic sizes available, small, medium and large. Even this determination can be a challenge without another to compare it to. This Field Guide assumes no original paint colors are present, either in the stove case or the fuel tank, and no nickel plating remains on the legs. Once a positive identification has been made, the ICCC’s Guide to Vintage Coleman Products book can be used to determine the rest of the features each model should have.

Always start at step one, do not skip to the middle.

I. Two Burner Stoves: (For three-burner stoves, see Part II at the bottom of page)

1. Sheet metal stove-top with cast iron burner inserts: go to step 8

2. Removable wire grate (8 parallel wires across) – go to step 9

3. Hinged grate formed from a single continuous folded wire – go to step 10

4. Hinged grate with 9 parallel grate wires, each a single wire welded to two cross wires – go to step 11

5. Hinged grate with 10 parallel grate wires, most or all bent double: go to step 12

6. Hinged grate with 10 parallel grate wires, each a single wire welded to two cross wires – go to step 13

7. Cast iron grate, stove with attached oven – model 2C

8. Sheet metal stovetop with cast iron burner inserts (should have a riveted identification badge above the handle.) If not:

a. Burner unit pulls out diagonally via a flat bar, with or without oven – Model 1

b. Burner unit pulls straight out the front of the case via a flat bar, stove with attached oven:

1. Stove case with wire legs, lid held with two folding tabs – early Model 2

2. Stove case with strap steel legs that also secure the lid – later Model 2

9. Removable grate (8 parallel wires across)

a. Fuel cap 3 piece (lantern style)

1. Auxiliary burner control a bakelite knob extending out left side of case; wire legs – Model 4F

2. Aux. burner control a bakelite knob extending out left side of case; strap legs – late Mod. 412B

3. Auxiliary burner control a metal “key” extending out left side of case – Model 417B

b. Winged male threaded fuel cap:

1. Burner caps one piece “toothed” cast iron – Model 6F

2. Burner caps “slotted” three piece cast iron:

a. Fuel tank doesn’t attract a magnet (Everdur) – Model 6B

b. Fuel tank attracts a magnet (Solodur) – early Model 412B

10. Hinged grate formed from a single continuous folded wire:

a. Front of case below handle embossed with “Coleman Lamp Co. WICHITA KANSAS USA” – Model 9

b. Front of case not stamped as above – Model 9C

11. Hinged grate with 9 parallel grate wires, each a single wire welded to two cross wires:

a. Band-a-blu burners (thin corrugated burner rings):

Stove with oven – Model 2G

Stove without oven – Model 9G

b. Cast iron “slotted” 3-piece burners (one heavy cast iron burner cap and two cast burner rings):

1. Winged fuel cap:

a. Pump with pinned stem and keyhole cap, no positive shut-off: (may have been replaced!)

1. Stove with oven – Model 2H These two models would

2. Stove without oven – Model 9H have had painted legs

b. Pump without pinned stem and keyhole cap, has a positive shut-off:

1. Stove with oven – Model 2B These two models would

2. Stove without oven – Model 9B have had nickel plated legs

2. Three-piece fuel cap:

a. Stove without oven – Model 415C

b. Stove with oven:

1. Auxiliary burner a bakelite knob extending out the front of the case – Model 416B

2. Auxiliary burner a metal “key” extending out the front of the case – Model 416C

12. Hinged grate with 10 parallel grate wires, most or all bent double:

a. Wires bent at front of grate, gap in front right section to accommodate fuel tank bracket – model 2D

b. Wires bent at rear of grate, no gap in front right section:

1. Grate with wider gap in middle section – Model 9D

2. Grate without wider gap in middle section; fuel control knob bent upward at fuel tank with a separate regulating valve/tip cleaner on the generator:

a. Fuel tank attracts a magnet:

1. Stove with oven – model 2E

2. Stove without oven – model 9E

b. Fuel tank doesn’t attract a magnet: (Everdur metal)

1. Stove with oven – model 2F

2. Stove without oven – model 9F

13. Hinged grate with 10 parallel grate wires, each a single wire welded to two cross wires:

a. Cast iron “toothed” one piece burner cap – Model 10 Gypsy

b. Band-a-blu burners (thin corrugated burner rings):

1. Case with square corners, legs swing around to secure the lid – Model 3F

2. Case with rounded corners, retractable legs do no secure the lid – Model 419

c. Cast iron “slotted” 3-piece burners:

1. Top edge of wind wings a straight line all the way to the lid – Model 3H

2. Top edge of wind wings flattened a few inches before meeting the lid – Model 413B

 

II. Three Burner Stoves

1. Case with squared corners, strap steel legs fold over lid: go to step 3

2. Case with rounded corners, retractable legs – Model 420

3. Case with squared corners

a. Fuel tank doesn’t attract a magnet, all burners three-piece cast iron, winged (male threaded) fuel cap – Model 418

b. Fuel tank attracts a magnet, center burner may be Band-a-blu, may have a winged (male threaded) or three-piece fuel cap – Model 418B